FreeBSD Hardware

Get CPU Information

You can use the dmesg utility to display the contents of the system message buffer when FreeBSD comes up. For accuracy I recommend querying /var/run/dmesg.boot file. Usually a snapshot of the buffer contents taken soon after file systems are mounted at startup time and dumped to /var/run/dmesg.boot file.

Check CPU Speed in FreeBSD using sysctl command

 

Type the following command at a shell prompt as root user:

# sysctl -a | egrep -i ‘hw.machine|hw.model|hw.ncpu’

 

Sample outputs:

 

hw.machine: amd64
hw.model: Intel(R) Xeon(R) CPU X5620 @ 3.33GHz
hw.ncpu: 4
hw.machine_arch: amd64

 

So I have an Intel Xeon quad core processor running at 3.33GHz speed.

 

FreeBSD CPUINFO using dmesg command

Type the following command:

 

# dmesg | grep -i cpu

 

Or directly query /var/run/dmesg.boot file:

# grep -i cpu /var/run/dmesg.boot

 

Output:

[code] CPU: Dual Core AMD Opteron(tm) Processor 170 (1999.08-MHz 686-class CPU)
FreeBSD/SMP: Multiprocessor System Detected: 2 CPUs
cpu0 (BSP): APIC ID: 0
cpu1 (AP): APIC ID: 1
cpu0: on acpi0
acpi_throttle0: on cpu0
cpu1: on acpi0
acpi_throttle1: on cpu1
SMP: AP CPU #1 Launched! [/code]

 

You can also dump more information using sysctl command:

# sysctl -a | grep -i cpu | less

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